Tag Archives: North Shore

Leigh & Lynn Scenic Reserves

We were there for the big kauri, so we entered Leigh Reserve through the Morriggia Place entrance.

Morriggia Road entrance to Leigh Scenic Reserve
Morriggia Road entrance to Leigh Scenic Reserve

The bush opens onto a grassy area with a bench overlooking a house and driveway.  The grassy bit slopes downhill and enters the bush, and things get interesting.

Leigh Scenic Reserve
Leigh Scenic Reserve

The big kauri right at the edge of the bush is unusual in that the view of it’s entire height is unblocked by other trees.  It’s impressive, but the big one appears as you reach the top of the steps at the bottom right of the picture below.

2nd biggest kauri tree at the top of Leigh Reserve
2nd biggest kauri tree at the top of Leigh Reserve

This is the largest kauri on Auckland’s North Shore.    It’s over 2 meters in diameter, and could be as old as 800 years.

Big kauri
Big kauri

With many kauri, you can only see clearly the part that is below or above the canopy.  Fortunately the trail leads right past the trunk of this big tree, so you get a different perspective.  Pictures often fail to capture the size of these trees.  The pic below probably comes closest.

Big kauri in Leigh Scenic Reserve
Big kauri

The bush at Leigh Scenic Reserve is shady with a large variety of trees.

Leigh Scenic Reserve
Leigh Scenic Reserve

there are plenty of nikau palm.

Leigh/Lynn Scenic Reserve
Leigh/Lynn Scenic Reserve
Leigh/Lynn Scenic Reserve
Leigh/Lynn Scenic Reserve

And fern trees.

Leigh/Lynn Scenic Reserve
Leigh/Lynn Scenic Reserve
Leigh/Lynn Scenic Reserve
Leigh/Lynn Scenic Reserve
Leigh/Lynn Scenic Reserve
Leigh/Lynn Scenic Reserve

Before reaching the opposite side of Lynn Reserve we turned around and walked back.

Leigh/Lynn Scenic Reserve
Leigh/Lynn Scenic Reserve

Leigh and Lynn Reserves are another couple of really nice lush and shady Kaipatiki region reserves.  They’re great for trees in general and kauri in particular.

Please enjoy the full gallery of 14 pictures below.  To view on imgur, click here.

Kaipatiki, Kauri Park and Soldiers Bay

At the end of November I moved to a different part of Auckland’s North Shore.  I set out to explore the parks and reserves in my new neighborhood, starting with Kauri Park.

Kauri tree in Kauri Park
Kauri tree in Kauri Park

I rediscovered Kaipatiki Explorer, a guide to the parks and reserves in an area between highways 1 and 16 on Auckland’s north shore.  Unfortunately it has been recently updated to the 2017 version, which offers convenient navigation, but limits how much you can zoom in, a problem on mobile phone when you need to have a good close look at a map.  Fortunately I was able to pick up a printed version of this guide, and I can photograph the maps I need with my phone before I set out.  I found it at Fernglen Native Plant Gardens. It looked like such literature is commonly available there.

The main entrance to Kauri Park on Rangatira Road is easy to miss.  There’s a carpark that can fit just 8 cars, and the usual kit for cleaning your shoes, to try to keep out Kauri dieback disease.

Entrance to Kauri Park
Entrance to Kauri Park

I took the route that leads directly to the big(ish) kauri.  The biggest trees here are a few hundred years, if I recall correctly.  There are benches provided to allow you to sit and contemplate these big trees, especially the first group.

Kauri Park
Kauri Park

There are quite a few kauri to be enjoyed in this area.  I’m not sure that’s a kauri in the pic below, but boardwalks are usually placed wherever necessary to keep people from walking on kauri roots.

Kauri Park
Kauri Park

I left Kauri Park on the path toward Soldiers Bay, and soon saw this plank path through the wetlands.

Plank path to Soldiers Bay
Plank path to Soldiers Bay

I investigated, and quickly arrived at Soldiers Bay.

Soldiers Bay
Soldiers Bay

On the other side of Soldiers Bay is Kauri Point Domain.

Kauri Point Domain
Kauri Point Domain across Soldiers Bay

The tide was very low, so I decided to see how far I could walk on the foreshore to the north.

Soldiers Bay
Soldiers Bay

The rock shelf was muddy, but it wasn’t deep.  I didn’t go far, but it looked like I could have continued.

Soldiers Bay
Soldiers Bay

When I got back to Kauri Park I continued clockwise to complete the largest loop.  I went a ways down a side path that I believe leads into Muriel Fisher Reserve.  Muriel Fisher Reserve is not listed in the Kaipatiki Explorer guide, and I’ve read that it isn’t being maintained, so info is limited, but I’ll go back for a look some time.

You can view the full gallery of 13 pictures below.  To view on imgur click here.