Tag Archives: Point to Point Walkway

Achilles Point to Point England, on the foreshore

Just a few days after walking Tamaki Drive the tide was right for walking Achilles Point to Point England on the foreshore.  When the weather decided to cooperate as well, I knew what I had to do.

St Heliers Beach
St Heliers Beach

I did most of the Point to Point Walkway previously on the roads and paths, and realized that I should go back and walk this part of the coast on the foreshore.

To see Achilles Point to Point England on Google Maps click here.

At the east end of St Heliers Beach are the remnants of some structure that appear to have been stairs up to the rock shelf.  Climbing up was just a bit tricky, with some holes that probably once held posts offering footholds to supplement what nature provided.

Rocks at the east end of St Heliers Beach
Rocks at the east end of St Heliers Beach

The high rock shelf, along with the cliffs and the view of Rangitoto Island, looks like everything I love about walking the foreshore.  In the distance you can see the walkway down to Ladies Bay Beach.

Just east of St Heliers Beach on the way to Ladies Bay Berach
Just east of St Heliers Beach on the way to Ladies Bay Berach

This is the most dangerous part of the walk.  I started about 3 hours before low tide.  Closer to low tide maybe that I could have walked along the shore below these rocks, but I had some distance to cover and a window of maybe 6 hours, so I pressed on.

Before I continue, a warning about walking the foreshore:

***

Do you know the sound of thunder, Dear Reader?

Can you imagine that sound if I ask you to?

I have warned more than one companion that the conditions on the foreshore can be extremely slippery (and dangerous in other ways as well) moments before they hit the ground, hard.

But I didn’t say it in thunder.

Dear Reader, listen to the thunder.

Be very careful when walking the foreshore!

***

Note that this most treacherous part of this walk is easily avoided by walking up Cliff Road from St Heliers, and then down the paved path to Ladies Bay.

Bridge out between St Heliers Beach and Ladies Bay Beach
Bridge out between St Heliers Beach and Ladies Bay Beach

It seems clear that there was once a series of bridges allowing visitors to walk from St Heliers Beach to Ladies Bay Beach along the shore, probably even at high tide.  Each broken bridge now marks the site of some especially challenging terrain to cross.

Bridge out between St Heliers Beach and Ladies Bay Beach
Bridge out between St Heliers Beach and Ladies Bay Beach

There is challenging terrain not marked by the remains of bridges as well.  It’s a short walk from St Heliers Beach to Ladies Bay Beach, but the going is slow.

Approaching Ladies Bay Beach
Approaching Ladies Bay Beach

It didn’t yet know what lay around the corner, but at this point my way forward was clear.

Approaching Ladies Bay
Approaching Ladies Bay

It is an un-researched theory of mine that that the foreshore walkway was has not been maintained to make it harder for the uninformed to accidentally wonder from St Heliers Beach onto Ladies Bay Beach.  Auckland Council makes it clear that there are no clothing optional beaches in Auckland, but Ladies Bay Beach is known as one all the same.

Walkway down to Ladies Bay Beach
Walkway down to Ladies Bay Beach

As you can see below, there was no nudity on Ladies Bay Beach on the day I visited.  But that may be because police activity near the beach has pushed that demographic around the point to the much longer beach at Gentlemens Bay.

A simple Google search offers lots of interesting reading on the reputation of Ladies Bay Beach, and on nude beaches in Auckland.

Ladies Bay Beach
Ladies Bay Beach

Just around Achilles Point, the long beach at Gentlemens Bay offers a feeling of seclusion, at least for a short while.

Gentlemans Bay Beaach
Gentlemens Bay Beach

A little further along I chose a fallen tree at the back of the beach and sat down to have lunch.  It was near a ladder that apparently provides access to the beach.  I’d guess it leads up to Glover Park.

Access to Gentlemens Bay Beaach
Access to Gentlemens Bay Beach

I didn’t realize at the time that I had stopped just before a very nude, very gay stretch of Gentlemens Bay Beach.  As I got out my sandwich and apple (actual lunch items, not slang terms for something else), I had a conversation that I could have done without.  During my lunch nude men strolled past.  A few clothed men ascended and descended the ladder.

Gentlemans Bay Beaach
Gentlemens Bay Beach

I walked the rest of Gentlemens Bay out at the edge of the tide, with the shellfish, to avoid similar encounters.  Not that there’s anything wrong with that.

Around the next point is Karaka Bay.

Karaka Bay Beach
Karaka Bay Beach

Although the public is allowed access to the foreshore throughout New Zealand, some parts of the coast are just difficult enough to reach that they seem to be sort of semi-private  beaches for the use of residents of the houses along the shore.  A small group of houses line the shore of Karaka Bay here, and their rowboats wait inverted at the back of the beach.

Karaka Bay Beach
Karaka Bay Beach

The foreshore always has interesting rock formations.

Coast of Tamaki Strait
Coast of Tamaki Strait

This part of the coast is close to Browns Island, and also to the ferries coming and going from Half Moon Bay.

Rangitoto and Browns Island
Rangitoto and Browns Island

By this point there is mud on top of the rock shelf even near to the shore.

Approaching the Glendowie Boating Club
Approaching the Glendowie Boating Club

The green grass of Roberta Reserve offers a nice break from an especially muddy part of the coast.

Roberta Reserve
Roberta Reserve

Across a stream lined with mangroves lies the Tahuna Torea Nature Reserve, and I was back on the beach.

Sandspit Beach at Tahuna Torea Nature Reserve
Sandspit Beach at Tahuna Torea Nature Reserve

Here’s a nice view of Browns Island over the low-tide mudflats from Sandspit Beach.

Browns Island from Sandspit Beach
Browns Island from Sandspit Beach

The Spit extends most of the way across Half Moon Bay, and it looks like you could walk most of it at low tide.  Check it out on Google Earth.

The Spit
The Spit

But it got really windy at this point, as I suspect it often does, so I just rounded the point and headed south.

Looking south toward Maungarei Mountain
Looking south toward Maungarei Mountain

It soon got muddy again, so I took the path through Tahuna Torea and crossed the road to Wai O Taiki Nature Reserve.

Entrance to Wai O Taiki Nature Reserve
Entrance to Wai O Taiki Nature Reserve

I struck out along the coast, but I only got a short distance before I was forced to turn inland.

Foreshore of Wai O Taiki Nature Reserve
Foreshore of Wai O Taiki Nature Reserve

It was a very inviting ascent, and I discovered a path half-way up the hill, before the back yards of the houses visible above.

point-to-point-auckland-dsc_6030

Flowers at Wai O Taiki Nature Reserve
Flowers at Wai O Taiki Nature Reserve

I’m not sure how open fields make a nature reserve, but that’s what most of Wai O Taiki Nature Reserve seems to be.  This made it easy to see the path following the coast ahead.

Wai O Taiki Nature Reserve
Wai O Taiki Nature Reserve

Mount Maunganui rises in the distance over the pastures of this reserve, and of Point England.

Mount Maunganui
Mount Maunganui

Point England is also mostly open pastures.  A couple I spoke with said that these fields were a habitat for the endangered New Zealand dotterel.

Point England
Point England

Point England has beaches also, so I was able to get back to the foreshore.

Point England
Point England

On the beaches of Point England I had my unexpected wildlife encounter of the walk – a group of royal spoonbill.  These are more common on the south island.

Royal spoonbill
Royal spoonbill

During breeding season these birds get really interesting haircuts to impress the ladies.

Royal spoonbill - from Wikimedia Commons
Royal spoonbill – from Wikimedia Commons

I got too close, and they flew away.

Royal spoonbill
Royal spoonbill

I could see on Google Maps that a strip of grass extends south of Point England along the coast, so I decided to keep walking.  It starts as a narrow strip of grass between the coast and backyard fences, then gets wider, with a path and some picnic tables.  I came to a boat ramp, so I went back down to walk just a bit more of the muddy foreshore.  This area is called Tamaki, and the water is still part of Tamaki Strait.

Tamaki Coast
Tamaki Coast

I reached Mount Wellington War Memorial Reserve, and decided to call it a wrap.  I consulted Google Maps again, and caught a bus back to the ferry building.

Mount Wellington War Memorial Reserve
Mount Wellington War Memorial Reserve

There are hazards of a diverse and sometimes homoerotic nature on this part of Auckland’s coast, and lots of mud, but this is a good walk all the same.

You can view the full gallery of 51 pictures below.  To view on imgur click here.

Point to Point Walkway

The Point to Point Walkway follows Auckland‘s coast from St. Heliers Bay to Point England.

Click here to see the area on Google Maps (note that this is not the exact walk, although it’s reasonably close).

You can view the full gallery of 17 pictures below.  To view on imgur, click here.

I drove to St. Heliers on a beautiful Sunday morning, and it was so busy that I drove right on through and up the coast a short distance to Achilles Point. I walked along St. Heliers Beach later that evening, after taking a bus from the end of my walk.

St. Heliers Beach
St. Heliers Beach, Achilles Point in the background

St. Heliers has a nice beach, but Achilles Point is situated atop coastal cliffs, and has a viewing platform with nice views of central Auckland and Tamaki Straight, including Browns Island, which was looking especially photogenic that day.

Browns Island
Browns Island

Browns Island is a recreation reserve accessible only by kayak or small boat.  It is also one of the best preserved volcanoes in the Auckland volcanic field.

Auckland CBD from Achilles Point
Auckland CBD from Achilles Point
Pouwhenua at Achilles Point
Pouwhenua at Achilles Point

Glover Park is a nice enough little local park, but following the path shown below leads back to the cliffs and more great views of Tamaki Strait (the picture of Browns Island, above, was actually shot from Glover Park).

Glover Park
Glover Park

Churchill Park is mostly pastures, cows and tree stumps, but I’m sure it’s great for locals looking for a break from the roads and sidewalks.  It serves that same purpose for the Point to Point Walk as well.

Churchill Park
Churchill Park

After Churchill Park a short walk takes you back to the coast, and just a bit further the Tahuna Torea Nature Reserve begins.  Tahuna Torea is beaches much of the way, with great views, surrounded by green, and extends a great distance along the coast.

Tahuna Torea Nature Reserve
Tahuna Torea Nature Reserve

I followed the beach to a sand spit that extends out into Half Moon Bay.

Tahuna Torea Nature Reserve
Tahuna Torea Nature Reserve

I found that sand spit interesting enough that I had to walk to the very end.

Tahuna Torea Nature Reserve
Tahuna Torea Nature Reserve

The picture below looks back along the sand spit toward Tahuna Torea.  The body of water to the left is called Wai O Taiki Bay.

Tahuna Torea Nature Reserve
Tahuna Torea Nature Reserve

I had made it this far along the low tide route, but the tide was not low.  I was quickly stymied when I tried to continue along the coast, and had to backtrack a fair distance in order to make use of a boardwalk across a stretch of mud and mangroves and continue south.

Tahuna Torea Nature Reserve
Tahuna Torea Nature Reserve

It looks like Tahuna Torea transitions into Wai O Taiki Nature Reserve, then into Point England Reserve. I followed another boardwalk for a short Tahuna Torea walk, but when it reached a carpark I decided to call it a day, and catch a bus back to my car.

Tahuna Torea Nature Reserve
Tahuna Torea Nature Reserve

The walk from St. Heliers back up to Achilles Point offered a dramatic early evening view of the Auckland CBD.

Tamaki Strait and Auckland's CBD
Tamaki Strait and Auckland’s CBD

I plan to go back and finish this walk, but next time I’ll do it at low tide.  I think that I can do the whole thing along the coast, below the cliffs and along the beaches, avoiding the roads entirely.

You can view the full gallery of 17 pictures below.  To view on imgur, click here.