Tag Archives: wihan

Chiang Mai: Old City Temple Tour continued

Chiang Mai’s 15 foot high defensive wall protected the Old City for centuries. It was torn down for its bricks when the Japanese occupied Thailand during World War II. In the late 70s the city rebuilt the corners of the wall, and 5 of the gates, using old photographs.

Chang Phuak Gate - Old City
Chang Phuak Gate

We experienced the wall with a quick look at Chang Phuak Gate, and by just driving around the wall and moat in order to leave and enter the 1-square mile Old City. Some parts of the wall, such as the Fort of Hua-Lin, look to be worth exploring more closely, so I’ll make a point of doing that next time.

Fort of Hua-lin, from Wikimedia Commons
Fort of Hua-lin, from Wikimedia Commons

Wat Kun Kha Ma, the Horse Temple, is just a few blocks from Chang Phuak Gate.

Wat Kun Kha Ma, the Horse Temple
Wat Kun Kha Ma, the Horse Temple

The story of this temple, as I recall, is simple; once stables, it was made a temple to memorialize a beloved departed horse.

Wat Kun Kha Ma, the Horse Temple
Wat Kun Kha Ma, the Horse Temple

This is a small temple complex, attractive but with few remarkable features other than the horse focus.

Wat Kun Kha Ma, the Horse Temple
Wat Kun Kha Ma, the Horse Temple

Wat Kun Kha Ma does have a Buddha with an animated LED halo, with a sort of spider web above it.

Wat Kun Kha Ma, the Horse Temple
Wat Kun Kha Ma, the Horse Temple

Wat Rajamontean, the Dragon Temple, is a short distance further along Sri Poom Road.

Wat Rajamontean, the Dragon Temple
Wat Rajamontean, the Dragon Temple

Dragons are unusual at Thai temples, but they’re not what first catches the eye when approaching Wat Rajamontean from the street.

Wat Rajamontean, the Dragon Temple
Wat Rajamontean, the Dragon Temple

Most or all of the dragons flank the steps up from the street.

Wat Rajamontean, the Dragon Temple
Wat Rajamontean, the Dragon Temple

The Phaya Naga that decorate the roof are done in stained glass.

Wat Rajamontean, the Dragon Temple
Wat Rajamontean, the Dragon Temple

Most temples seem to be surrounded by other buildings, but I saw no way to access anything outside of Wat Rajamontean, other than by returning to the street.

Wat Rajamontean, the Dragon Temple
Wat Rajamontean, the Dragon Temple

There are temple spaces on two levels, each with its own white Buddha.

Wat Rajamontean, the Dragon Temple
Wat Rajamontean, the Dragon Temple

We went for the dragons, but we stayed for a beautifully detailed temple.

Wat Rajamontean, the Dragon Temple
Wat Rajamontean, the Dragon Temple

To reach Wat Lok Moli we crossed one of the pedestrian bridges over the moat, leaving the Old City. Wat Lok Moli is just north of it.

Moat bridge
Moat bridge

The view from across the street promised good things.

Wat Lok Moli
Wat Lok Moli

Red and green yaksha guard the gate.

Wat Lok Moli Yaksha
Wat Lok Moli Yaksha

Wat Lok Moli was built some time before its first known mention in a 1367 charter.

Wat Lok Moli Yaksha
Wat Lok Moli Yaksha

inside the gate are a pair of white elephants and trees with gold and silver leaves.

Wat Lok Moli
Wat Lok Moli

The phutthawat (temple complex) is crowded with statues of many faced and/or many-armed entities that reveal their Hindu connections.  Phra Phrom, below, is the Thai representation of the Hindu god Brahma.

Phra Phrom
Phra Phrom

Below is Phra Mae Kuan Im, the East Asian “Goddess of Mercy“. In Thailand she is often depicted with a mere 2 arms.

Wat Lok Moli
Wat Lok Moli

The wihan and chedi were built in 1527 by King Ket.

Wat Lok Moli
Wat Lok Moli

The wihan appears to be built from teak, but the outside eschews the usual gold trim.

Wat Lok Moli
Wat Lok Moli

The inside is more reminiscent of other Chiang Mai Old City temples.

Wat Lok Moli
Wat Lok Moli

The exposed brick of the chedi looks its age, but it’s in pretty great shape.

Wat Lok Moli
Wat Lok Moli

Across from the chedi is a display that appears to feature replicas of chedis of other temples.

Wat Lok Moli
Wat Lok Moli

I was drawn across the street to an attractive Phra Phikanet, or Ganesha.

Phra Phikanet, or Ganesha
Phra Phikanet, or Ganesha

How could I resist the general surrounded by an army of roosters? My little Tukata’s explanation: the general loved roosters. I guess so!

Rooster loving general
Rooster loving general

That was enough temples for one day, so we took a tuk tuk (my first) back to the hotel.

Please enjoy the full gallery of 51 pictures below.

Chiang Mai: Exploring Old City Temples on foot

Chiang Mai is nestled among the forested foothills of Thailand’s mountainous northwest. Old City is dominated by temples and surrounded by a medieval wall and moat.

Gate to Chiang Mai's City Pillar Shrine and Wat Chedi Luang
Gate to Chiang Mai’s City Pillar Shrine and Wat Chedi Luang

We immediately noticed that there are a lot of foreigners in Chiang Mai. What I noticed was the large number of North Americans and Europeans. It was only on the second day that I noticed the large numbers of Chinese and Koreans.

The shrine's giant tree and a yaksha
The shrine’s giant tree and a yaksha

Above are the gate to Chiang Mai’s City Pillar Shrine and Wat Chedi Luang and the giant tree that towers over the walls. Below you can see the City Pillar Shrine, the nearest building. There is a small fee to enter this temple complex.

City Pillar Shrine
City Pillar Shrine

The City Pillar or Lak Mueang was moved here from Wat Inthakhin Sadue Muang in 1800 by King Chao Kawila. I don’t know why this City Pillar is in the shape of a human figure, unlike those in Udon Thani and Ban Dung – or why women are forbidden to enter this shrine.

Chiang Mai's City Pillar
Chiang Mai’s City Pillar

Next door is a wihan, the shrine hall that contains the principal Buddha images of this temple complex. This is the assembly hall where monks and laypeople congregate.

Wihan
Wihan

Among the Buddha images inside is Phra Chao Attarot (Eighteen-cubit Buddha).

Phra Chao Attarot (Eighteen-cubit Buddha)
Phra Chao Attarot (Eighteen-cubit Buddha)

Behind the wihan is Wat Chedi Luang. Construction of this temple started in the 14th century, but finished in the 15thn century. It was then 82 meters high and had a base diameter of 54 meters, at that time the largest building in the Lanna Kingdom.

Wat Chedi Luang
Wat Chedi Luang

In 1545, the upper 30 meters of the structure collapsed after an earthquake.

Wat Chedi Luang
Wat Chedi Luang

In the early 1990s the chedi was reconstructed, financed by UNESCO and the Japanese government. The result is somewhat controversial, as some claim the new elements are in Central Thai style, not Lanna style. The top was not reconstructed because no one knows what it looked like.

Wat Chedi Luang
Wat Chedi Luang

Some of the temple’s elephants were reconstructed.

Wat Chedi Luang
Wat Chedi Luang

From the chedi/stupa there’s more space to get a good look at the wihan.

Wihan
Wihan

The chedi is surrounded by impressive buildings and statues and such.

At Wat Chedi Luang
At Wat Chedi Luang

Wat Chedi Luang hosts monk chats daily. Tourists are invited to speak with monks (usually novices) and ask them anything about Buddhism or Thailand.

At Wat Chedi Luang
At Wat Chedi Luang

We had set out on a walking tour of Old City temples. City Pillar Shrine and Wat Chedi Luang are highlights of Chiang Mai’s Old City. They became our first stop because they were near our hotel, and too enticing to save for later.

At Wat Chedi Luang
At Wat Chedi Luang

With over 120 temples within the city walls it is important to prioritize. We had a route and a map, but I’d suggest reviewing each temple on any such tour to be identify the ones you most want to visit. Walking between sites is tiring in the Thai heat, and we spent a good amount of time at many of the temples sites we visited.

At Wat Chedi Luang
At Wat Chedi Luang
At Wat Chedi Luang
At Wat Chedi Luang

City Pillar Shrine and Wat Chedi Luang are a must-see in Chiang Mai.

reclining Buddha at Wat Chedi Luang
reclining Buddha at Wat Chedi Luang

Even though we left Wat Chedi Luang with new ideas about the length of temple visits, and knowing that it would be important to prioritize, we made it less than a block along before we made an unplanned stop at nearby Wat Phan Tao.

Wat Phan Tao
Wat Phan Tao

Wat Phan Tao was founded in the 14th century. Like most of the temples of that time, it is constructed from teak with gold accents.

Wat Phan Tao
Wat Phan Tao

An especially striking teak and gold temple beckoned from Intrawarot Road. We didn’t realize at the time that this is Wat Inthakhin Sadue Muang, the original home of the City Pillar.

Wat Inthakhin Sadue Muang
Wat Inthakhin Sadue Muang

Three Kings Monument is a bronze statue of and shrine to Kings Mengrai, Ramkamhaeng and Ngam Muang, who worked together in the late 1200’s to design and build Chiang Mai.

Three Kings Monument
Three Kings Monument

Less than a minute away from our next destination we were drawn into a small alley by the beauty of Wat Lam Chang. The gardens contribute nicely to the beauty of this small temple next to ruins of an old chedi.

Wat Lam Chang
Wat Lam Chang

Lam Chang means “shackled elephants”. King Mengrai kept his white elephants in the forested area here during the construction of Chiang Mai.

Wat Lam Chang
Wat Lam Chang

King Mengrai lived at the location of Wat Chiang Man during the building of Chinag Mai.

Wat Chiang Man
Wat Chiang Man

In 1297 he built Wat Chiang Man as Chiang Mai’s first temple. One of the standing Buddhas below is said to be the oldest intact Buddha in Chiang Mai.  It has the year 1465 CE engraved on its base.

Inside the wihan at Wat Chiang Man
Inside the wihan at Wat Chiang Man

Chiang Mai was build to replace Chiang Rai as the capitol of the Lanna Kingdom. Chiang Mai means “New City”. The Lanna Kingdom became the Kingdom of Chiang Mai, a tributary state of Thailand from 1774 to 1899, and then the seat of a  ceremonial prince until 1939.

Inside the wihan at Wat Chiang Man
Inside the wihan at Wat Chiang Man

Also inside the wihan is a display with 9 different Buddha statues, with signs suggesting appropriate prayers for 8 of them. Those 8 are each associated with a different day of the week, with Wednesday morning and evening separately represented. Depending on the day you were born, one pose will have particular significance for you.

Wat Chiang Man
Wat Chiang Man

Before my little Tukata explained further, I saw it as a gallery of the various Buddha statue poses. From left to right they are (above): Earth Touching Buddha, the most common pose found in Thai temples, Sunday Buddha is similar to Contemplation Buddha, and the pose suggests mental insight, and Protection Buddha (Monday).

Below middle: Reclining Buddha (Tuesday), Alms Collecting Buddha (with the bowl for donations – Wednesday morning).

Wat Chiang Man
Wat Chiang Man

Below: Buddha sitting with Monkey and Elephant (Wednesday evening), Meditation Buddha (Thursday), Naga Buddha (Friday).

Wat Chiang Man
Wat Chiang Man

There are more poses that appear in traditional Buddha statues. You can learn about them in more detail here.

Wat Chiang Man
Wat Chiang Man

The ‘Elephant Chedi’ is the oldest construction in the Wat Chiang Man temple complex.

Wat Chiang Man
Wat Chiang Man

There’s an outdoor shrine to King Mengrai.

Wat Chiang Man
Wat Chiang Man

I found the shrine below to be a very cool and innovative approach.

Wat Chiang Man
Wat Chiang Man
Wat Chiang Man
Wat Chiang Man

Wat Saen Muang Ma Luang (Wat Hua Khuang) is hidden away in the middle of an Old City block, and the buildings seem to be open to visitors at limited or irregular hours, but it’s one of my favorite temple complexes in Chiang Mai.

Wat Saen Muang Ma Luang (Wat Hua Khuang)
Wat Saen Muang Ma Luang (Wat Hua Khuang)

The area is crowded with structures, but full of spectacular detail.

Wat Saen Muang Ma Luang (Wat Hua Khuang)
Wat Saen Muang Ma Luang (Wat Hua Khuang)

There don’t seem to be many tourists here.

Wat Saen Muang Ma Luang (Wat Hua Khuang)
Wat Saen Muang Ma Luang (Wat Hua Khuang)

A Google Maps review suggests that some of the architecture may show a Burmese style.

Wat Saen Muang Ma Luang (Wat Hua Khuang)
Wat Saen Muang Ma Luang (Wat Hua Khuang)

The stupa would appear to be the oldest structure at the site.

Wat Saen Muang Ma Luang (Wat Hua Khuang)
Wat Saen Muang Ma Luang (Wat Hua Khuang)

Some reviews warn about the stray dogs. I couldn’t miss them, but they gave us no trouble.

Wat Saen Muang Ma Luang (Wat Hua Khuang)
Wat Saen Muang Ma Luang (Wat Hua Khuang)

Our walking tour of Chiang Mai’s Old City temples continued, but experience has taught me to limit the size of my posts. I’ll bring you the second half of our walking tour in my next post.

As always, Wikipedia was invaluable in providing information for this post.

Please enjoy the full gallery of 60 pictures below.