Phaya Naga

Wat Kham Chanot, temple of the Phaya Naga

Wat Kham Chanot is a Buddhist temple that is very focused on worship of Phaya Naga. It is located in Kham Chanot forest,  believed to be the border between the human world and the netherworld. Both forest and temple are located on an island in Kut Kham, a marshy lake in which a Phaya Naga is said to live.

The temple complex has expanded off of the island, and includes a large standing Buddha and a permanent country market.

Standing Buddha and market
Standing Buddha and market

Among the many items for sale are offerings to the Phaya Naga. The likenesses below are mostly constructed of folded banana or coconut leaves. The products of this art vary greatly, mostly in the quality of the heads. These are among the best I’ve seen.

Banana/coconut leaf Phaya Naga
Banana/coconut leaf Phaya Naga

Of course there are also temple buildings adorned with Phaya Naga.

Temple with Phaya Naga
Temple with Phaya Naga

The bridge to the island was once very small. The new one is a fairly recent improvement. The entrance is flanked by a pair of 7-headed Phaya Naga.

Wat Kham Chanot is usually busy, so there is a police presence. At the entrance to the bridge an officer told me to remove my hat, suggesting that the entire island is considered a temple. An earlier clue that I had missed was that we had removed our shoes.

Bridge to old Wat Kham Chanot
Bridge to old Wat Kham Chanot

The bodies of the Phaya Naga extend along the entire length of the bridge, all the way to the island.

Bridge to old Wat Kham Chanot
Bridge to old Wat Kham Chanot

Golden frogs can be seen in the marsh on either side of the bridge.

Golden frogs
Golden frogs

Located right at the end of the bridge, the shrine on the right, below, had a constant line of people passing through. We didn’t wait in that line.

Temples on the island at old Wat Kham Chanot
Temples on the island at old Wat Kham Chanot

Phaya Naga can take human form, like the one seated on the altar below. Note the many offerings.

Phaya Naga in human form
Phaya Naga in human form

Phaya Naga sometimes appear with the upper body of a man or woman and the lower body of a snake – or in the case of the figures below, upper bodies of both humans and numerous (or multi-headed) serpent-form Phaya Naga.

Phaya Naga at Wat Kham Chanot
Phaya Naga at Wat Kham Chanot

The font below is said to flow from a spring. People anointed themselves with the water.

Font of the Phaya Naga
Font of the Phaya Naga

The many small shrines are built among some really cool old trees.

Wat Kham Chanot
Wat Kham Chanot

Paya Naga are also said to live in the Mekong River and estuaries. People of Laos and Thailand attribute the naga fireball phenomenon to Phaya Naga, along with standing waves, damage to vehicles and objects, and serpentine tracks that are frequently found. Scientists compare these and sightings of Phaya Naga with those of bigfoot and the Loch Ness monster.

Wat Kham Chanot
Wat Kham Chanot

“Naga fireballs, also known as bung fai paya nak or Mekong lights, are a phenomenon said to be often seen on the Mekong River. Glowing balls are alleged to naturally rise from the water high into the air. The balls are said to be reddish and to range in size from smaller sparkles up to the size of basketballs. They quickly rise up to a couple of hundred metres before disappearing. The number of fireballs reported varies between tens and thousands per night.” – Wikipedia

Wat Kham Chanot
Wat Kham Chanot

Recently a festival was held on the Mekong River. On TV I saw fireworks being launched from underwater to simulate naga fireballs. This is something I’ll try to learn more about.

Off of the island we visited a variety of small shrines, like the one below to some respected and deceased monk.

Shrine to a venerable monk at new Wat Kham Chanot
Shrine to a venerable monk at new Wat Kham Chanot

There were a number of large gongs available, and visitors could try various approaches to getting interesting sounds from them.

There are many ghost stories and hauntings associated with Wat Kham Chanot. Phaha Naga are said to sometimes go to the houses of people near the temple when they need something. Although people ask them for favors, they are very afraid of them.

After leaving the busy Wat Kham Chanot we stopped by an unfinished temple populated only by workers.

Unfinished temple
Unfinished temple

I find this temple exceptionally beautiful, and I like the open air design. There is something vaguely Nordic about it.

Unfinished temple
Unfinished temple

These Phaya Naga are some of the coolest I’ve seen, and I couldn’t resist using them as the featured picture for this post, in spite of the fact that they are not found at Wat Kham Chanot.

Phaya Naga
Phaya Naga

The inside too is simple and beautiful.

Unfinished temple
Unfinished temple
Unfinished temple
Unfinished temple

This temple has a paddock for deer. Wat Kham Chanot is said to have a small zoo of turtles, but I didn’t see that.

Deer
Deer

Please enjoy the full gallery of 20 pictures below.

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